artisnteasy

artisnteasy:

aeon-fux:

postracialcomments:

Update, 4:30 p.m.: The ACLU, responding to BuzzFeed's Chris Geidner on Twitter, says that the officer involved in the incident described above has been removed from duty following a public ACLU complaint.

Source

But………..

this is great and all but lets observe the fact that the moment a WHITE journalist is threatened, action is taken…while Michael Brown’s murderer still walks freely and the police officers threatening the lives of black people/hitting them with tear gas and rubber bullets are still on the clock 

"The St. Louis County spokesperson called the entire incident "inappropriate" and said it was "not indicative of the officers who have worked daily to keep the peace" in Ferguson."

They are so full of shit. There are multiple reports of officers pointing guns at protesters that posed no threat as a form of intimidation, of threatening to shoot them. But you know, if only we just respected the police amirite?

albinwonderland
Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions.

Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts. This may sound outrageous, but think about how you react when precocious children dominate the talk at an adult party. As women begin to make inroads into formerly ‘male’ domains such as business and professional contexts, we should not be surprised to find that their contributions are not always perceived positively or even accurately.
[x]  (via albinwonderland)